Images that shape your mind.

There are some images you see as a child, that truly shape who you are. Whatever the reason for it, the minute you see the image it becomes seared into your psyche and is referenced in your decision making process for the rest of your life.

For me that image was a black refrigerator magnet with a grey/silver drawing on it. It was a poured item and the drawn lines on it were raised from the background. The image was of an owl swooping down on a mouse. The mouse held a pistol behind his back. Underneath it said, “That’s confidence.”

I have spent an unreasonable amount of time thinking about this. Not to mention the amount of time I spent trying to draw it. In my mind the pistol, and even the notion of fighting back disappeared over time.

The idea of it representing confidence even became nonsense. Seriously, no gun that a creature the size of a mouse could hold and fire would ever be able to stop, let alone kill an inbound owl with hunger on its mind.

And as I got older and became aware of philosophies like stoicism and transcendentalism… I adopted ideas like “no fear, no regrets” and chose to live my life by them. Pirate concepts like “No quarter asked, and none given” became my rallying cry.

When I look back at the directions I took philosophically. It is all rooted in that image.

Well I replaced the mouse’s gun with a middle finger, and instead of staring at the owl, he is looking off to the side, to whatever it is that he wants to look at.

His death isn’t important. The way he is choosing to live is.

“Elige Bene Mori” 18×24 Goauche on watercolor paper

“Elige Bene Mori” is latin for choose a good death. I encourage you to embrace this notion and hold it close to your heart. The original painting in gouache on watercolor paper is not currently for sale, but you can purchase prints of it through my account at Fine Art America, HERE.

Nosferatu Stalking

I spend a bit of time perusing the internets, looking at other peoples art, soaking up their images, experiencing their images, and seeing what inspires me. At the beginning of November I wanted to take a little break from my series on Ukiyo-E, so I was on one of those strolls through other artists minds.

While doing so, I noticed a significant amount of photographs, paintings and drawings of women in Victorian dress under street lights. The thing that struck me about this artistically was the shadow play. Being that I consider light and shadow to be one of my more glaring weak spots, I thought this might be a subject work entertaining.

The next thought I had showed me that doing a single large ink project for Inktober/Drawloween was not enough to purge my spookiness for the season. That thought was that there really should be something stalking her from the shadows.

This of course gave me the opportunity to draw one of my favorite versions of a victim of vampirism, the Nosferatu. It is both timely for the period, and fitting for the scene.

“Nosferatu Stalking” 18×24 Gouache on watercolor paper

Currently I have not made prints available of this 18×24 inch gouache painting, but I will make it available if there is interest. The original is for sale.

Buddhist Hell

When one thinks of Buddhism, the thought is usually one of peaceful serenity, unless they are fans of kung fu theatre or are following some of the more violent uprisings in SE Asia currently.

What one does not usually think of is a concept of hell. Well, just like most other major religions, Buddhism has a concept of hell. Several actually, but the one todays art piece entertains a specific one. The Realm of Hungry Ghosts.

For those unfamiliar with Buddhist lore. A Hungry Ghost is basically someone who is a slave to their desires, aversions, and/or passions. More specifically it is described as both a form of reincarnation and a realm where one is constantly haunted by those sufferings until they free themselves of them by practice of the eightfold path.

The inspiration for this piece came from a Japanese interpretation of this, which was named Gaki Zoshi (Hungry Ghosts). It is a very old scroll and you can find images from it all over the internets.

I did the piece as an Inktober project in 2021, and being pen and ink it took the entire month.

“The Realm of Hungry Ghosts” 18×24 pen and ink (fineliner) on Watercolor paper.

This pen and ink piece is originally 18×24 on watercolor paper and prints are available through Fine Art America here.

A different view of Geisha

So I am going to start off by acknowledging that Goze are not technically Geisha. They do however have two very important factors in common.

They are both women and they both make their living by entertaining men.

When I decided to broach the subject of Geisha in my series reflecting on Ukiyo-E, I did not want to do the same four or five poses and images of a half dressed beautiful woman looking over her shoulder that is prevalent in that space.

So I decided to draw a Goze instead. For those who do not know, a Goze is a blind woman who makes her living by playing music in public for tips. A Goze is basically a busker.

So I drew her sitting on the stoop of a business in a medieval Japanese town playing her Biwa.

“The Goze” Gouache on watercolor paper 18×24

You can find prints of this image or purchase the original at this page.

Zen art, nature, and Ukiyo-E

Outside the fine art and historical world, most of the interest and support for Ukiyo-E is in the Manga community. The positive there is that comic books and anime are constantly drawing young eyes to a much broader world of expression (just like they have always done). The negative is that a great deal of beautiful work gets ignored in favor of battle scenes, yokai, and other more graphic forms.

As for myself, my first exposures to Ukiyo-E came through an interest in Buddhist art, and an attraction to the simple elegance of Japanese art in general.

Some of the most under rated Ukiyo-E images are portrayals of nature. This is the point where a more scholarly sort would talk about the development of the style and how it came to Japan through mimicking the Chinese style of landscape and so on…but I am not here to provide art history so much as to talk about the art I am presenting.

At any rate, I do not attempt much in the way of nature art…for reasons previously discussed in a post about an oil I did (Painting hard feelings). The painting I am posting today is an exception to that and I kind of painted myself into a corner with the need to do it when I decided to do a series based on Ukiyo-E.

The reason I felt like it had to be done is because no nod to Japanese art and beauty could ever be complete without several subjects being covered. Amongst them would be Samurai, Geisha, Buddhism, Mount Fuji, and of course Cherry blossoms. In this series, so far I have addresses all but Mount Fuji… and of the ones completed I have shared all but one of a Geisha here on this website, after this post of course.

Todays painting is titled “Sparrow and Cherry Blossom” and is simple image of a sparrow perched on a cherry branch in bloom.

Sparrow and Cherry Blossom

“Sparrow and Cherry Blossom” is an 18×24 gouache painting on watercolor paper. The original piece and prints are available here.

Is it still sexy?

The image I am sharing today is a nod to Tsukioka Yoshitoshi. Yoshitoshi is one of the great Ukiyo-E artists who lived from 1839 to 1892. If you have glanced at Japanese art, and especially Ukioyo-E you have undoubtedly seen some of his work.

Of his work, my favorite come from a series classified as muzan-e (cruel pictures) by the name of “28 famous murders”. In this set one particular image caught my eye and struck me as amusing. It is the 12th in the series, is titled “Inada Kyūzō Shinsuke: woman suspended from rope”, and features a woman being murdered by Shinsuke while she is hanging in shibari.

At this time I feel like I should note that my amusement was not at this woman’s murder or the savagery of its method (though it is a compelling image), but lies in the fact that today shibari (or rope bondage) is a very popular fetish when historically it was used as a brutal form of torture.

Psychologically it makes sense for a ton of reasons ranging from risk taking to the physical confusion between pleasure and pain that BDSM practitioners know well.

Nevertheless, the image struck me so I felt compelled to do an homage to it as part of my series of honoring Ukiyo-e. That series by the way is not complete, but has seemed to burn itself out lately and I am working on other projects.

All of that is why I gave the piece the title, “Is it still sexy?”. A tongue in cheek question for the whole BDSM scene.

“Is it still sexy?” 18×24 Gouache and brush pen on watercolor paper.

Prints are available in a variety of formats at my Fine Art America store.

Thoughts and Prayers

Its been a few months since I posted anything here. I would like to say it is because I have been super busy and just haven’t had time to share.

The truth is that this is pretty typical for me.

I have still been making art…just not as intensely. I still have a bunch of art I want to share, talk about, and even sell… but I am revisiting how I want to go about that. And a bunch of other side thoughts that have nothing to do with this post.

What does have to do with this post is bright colors, skeletons, hallucinogens, water color brush pens, and bristol board.

“Thoughts and Prayers” 9×12 water color brush pens on Bristol

It was fun to draw and even more fun to “research” having mushrooms on the brain.

Currently I do not have any prints of this being sold, but depending on how I move forward, that is likely to change.

Yin Yang

Today I am going to share two separate gouache paintings I have recently done.

They are also Buddhist and Japanese history pieces.

The first features Toyotomi Hideyoshi; samurai, daimyo, Shogun and second great unifier of Japan. The image is from early in his rise to power.

It is said that he greatly desired to have tea at the famous tea house of Sen no Rikyu, who was also known to have one of the most beautiful morning glory gardens in all of Japan.

At first Rikyu had rebuffed him. But knowing the samurai was growing impatient, Rikyu decided to have him.

Before the day of their tea, Rikyu dug up all of his magnolia gardens and selected only one. Placing it in a simple bamboo vase in the tea room.

When Hideyoshi arrived, he was enraged that the gardens were gone. He stomped into the tea house, and was stopped cold.

The single morning glory was perfect, and upon seeing it Hideyoshi saw Rikyu’s mind clearly and went on to become one of the great Shoguns in Japans history.

It is titled “Rikyu’s Morning Glory”

Rikyu’s Morning Glory 18×24 Gouache

The second image is of Sen no Rikyu. He is the great tea master modern tea ceremony is based upon. He served two Shoguns as tea master and was of such great stature that he could have audience with anyone in Japan when he was alive.

The image is of him committing Seppuku on Hideyoshi’s order.

The reason is lost to history, but every version of it I have seen guessed at has been the result of ego and petty jealousy.

Hideyoshi’s Gratitude 18×24 Gouache

I am not sure how I managed to save those images at different sizes, but it is of little concern. What is important is that they are available in a couple of print sizes in my Fine Art America store. Rikyu’s Morning Glory here and Hideyoshi’s Gratitude here.

Yin Yang set of “Rikyu’s Morning Glory” and “Hideyoshi’s Gratitude”

Visual Koans

One of the things I like to draw, is a focus on another. That other being world religions. The focus being Buddhist art, more specifically Zen Buddhist art. It is especially true when I can do pieces based on Japanese Zen Buddhist art. Doing it in a Ukiyo-E drawing style just makes a well iced cake.

The image I am sharing today is all of that.

It is also an entirely stolen concept.

I did do Josetsu the honor of not attempting to redo his painting the way he did it. Further more, I didn’t do it in the same style.

I merely stole his Koan.

For the uninitiated, a Koan is a form of riddle in Zen Buddhism that is supposed to stimulate the potential for enlightenment when meditated upon.

This one in particular is called “Catching catfish with a gourd”, and was Josetsu’s original  suiboku  (basically Sumi) Painting was done C. 1415 .

The painting depicts a man standing by a creek and attempting to cat a catfish with a gourd (as the title suggests).

I won’t post the original image, as I do not wish to be shamed by the comparison. However, here is my original painting.

Catching a Catfish with a Gourd

In the 18×24 gouache painting the gourd represents our mind and the catfish represents enlightenment. The gourd being used for something it is clearly not suitable for. The clear implication being that our minds are not suitable for attaining enlightenment, and that it is not something that can be gained through thought.

It is certainly an idea worth tossing around in your head while trying not to think too much on anything in particular… at least until you figure out to just let go and breathe.

If you would like to own a print of this piece, it is available HERE. The original is not currently available for sale, but it will be once I complete the larger project it is part of. If you would like to be considered when it is, send me a message.

“Catching a Catfish with a Gourd” print.

Jesus Malverde

As I mentioned before I am fascinated by religion and other cultures.

The tee shirt design I am going to talk about today is legendary on both those fronts.

Jesus Malverde is a historical figure from Sinaloa Mexico born Jan 15, 1870. He was a bit of a Robin Hood character, that literally stole from the rich to give to the poor. That said, like most historical Robin Hoods, there is no evidence he ever lived, and was more likely an amalgamation of a couple other outlaws from the period and locale.

Mexico being very Catholic, very superstitious, and just as prone to making Saints of their heroes of course made him the patron saint of outlaws.

Because he was from Sinaloa, which of course is famous for its drug smuggling cartels, Mr. Malverde (also known as Jesús Juarez Mazo, Cjuba Lord, or the Angel of the Poor) was soon adopted by the smugglers and is widely regarded as the Narco-Saint.

That image is what drove the creation of my design…

Jesus Malverde TShirt.

On this shirt, Jesus Malverde is surrounded by a saints halo that is decorated with opium poppies, a laurel of marijuana flowers and leaves, and crossed sprigs of the coca bush.

You definitely want to go to my Tee Public store (Madman Designs) to buy it.

Please don’t wear at border crossings, on planes, or when travelling along what the police think are drug corridors unless you just want to be harassed by the authorities. Then again, do what you want… but be aware of the risks.